Almost Speechless


If there ever was a time to be in awe of the dominant force of human collaboration, it was last night.

This was not the effort of one person. An entire country’s heart and mind has been turned to the rescue of these miners for more than two months. This rescue is like an ever-sprouting tree: the seeds of pride and loyalty that have been planted have resulted in a flourishing and fruitful operation. Reading about it is like reading a great work of fiction; there has never been a “we can’t” moment. From the very beginning, this project has been comprehensive. Laurence Golborne–Chile’s brilliant mining minister–has proven to be a cogent and disciplined leader. He’s acted with incredible grace and efficiency. But last night was not about Laurence Golborne alone.

Leadership and organization that, perhaps, we will never fully know about, was exhibited above and below the ground. The world rallied around a single cause, and everyone, from my grandmother in an apartment in West Los Angeles, to my close friend in El Salvádor, to people in most other continents, were cheering Chile on.

To see these mens’ reactions to being freed from the maximum security prison of the earth is incredible. From booming elation, to quiet humility, to whatever the next reaction will be, these miners now share something–an experience we will never fully grasp.

Chile is not a powerful force in international politics. It’s had its (perhaps not-so-fair) share of communal struggles. Perhaps few remember, but if you think back hard enough, you’ll recall that Chile was struck by an 8.8 magnitude earthquake in February. The quake rattled six of the major cities in Chile–therefore affecting more than eighty percent of the population. But they’ve pulled themselves up and rebuilt. Last night, a technically less “influential” nation proved, again, to be a pioneering force of hope, optimism, and determination in this world.

This is what we’re capable of.

Viva Chile.